“The greatest deterrent
to freedom are men and women of zeal, well-meaning, but
without knowledge or understanding.”
~Justice Louis Brandeis~

"People are so quick to defend their own agendas, but they so often fail to realize we must protect the rights of all if we are to continue to have any rights of our own."
~Jenqu~

Ranch meaning, in general, any real world dwelling probably not involving full care board. Kind of a rural voice of real horse owners, trainers, traders, auction owners, rodeo contractors, etc.. all of us who have taken a verbal beating and called greedy ass hats. Back at the Ranch contributors, moderators, subjects, and so on, are pro-horse, pro-owner, and pro-slaughter.
Back at the Ranch was formed by a group of like minded horse / livestock owners. It is a place for us to try to educate, a place to vent our frustrations with the current equine industry, a place to share humor and snark, and in general try to open the eyes of the public who seem to be anti-agriculture.We do have a section for comments of course, and if you would like to email us you can do so directly or through the contact us form. We like to hear from our readers. I hope you enjoy reading our blog as much as I enjoy managing it.
Sincerely,
Ranch Manager
manager_back_at_the_ranch@yahoo.com

Monday, July 13, 2009

Some information to Support Saturday's satire-

OOPS Sorry Folks, I meant to post this on Sunday when it was emailed to me. Better Late than never.



http://www.aqha.com/aqharacing.com/news/09stories/09unwantedhorsesurvey.html

July 9, 2009 - The findings from the Unwanted Horse Coalition’s Study on Contributing Factors Surrounding the Unwanted Horse Issue are now available at http://www.unwantedhorsecoalition.org/.

The study is the first of its kind to assess the causes and magnitude of the unwanted horse population in the United States.
Results indicate that the problem of unwanted horses is perceived to be growing on many fronts. More than 90 percent of participants believe the number of unwanted horses, as well as those neglected and abused, is increasing, and 87 percent of the participants indicate that in the past year, the issue of unwanted horses has become “a big problem,” compared with only 22 percent who said the problem was important three years ago. Respondents also report that the number of horses being euthanized is increasing.In light of one of the worst economic downturns in U.S. history, the economy is considered to be a significant contributor to the unwanted horse problem. The closing of the nation’s processing facilities, changes in breed demand/indiscriminate breeding, as well as the high costs of euthanasia and carcass disposal are also cited by respondents as major contributors.Regarding placement options for unwanted horses, 63 percent of equine rescue/retirement facilities polled report they are at near or full capacity and, on average, turn away 38 percent of the horses brought to them. Capacity is clearly the issue in that as many horses stay for life at the facilities as are adopted out.Survey respondents believe the top solutions for solving the problem of unwanted horses are to educate owners to purchase and own responsibly, increase the ability of private rescue and retirement facilities to care for unwanted horses, reopen the U.S. processing plants, and increase options and resources for euthanizing and disposing of unwanted horses.“One of the highlights of the survey is the willingness by all respondents to resolve the unwanted horse problem,” said Tom R. Lenz, DVM, chair of the UHC. “We believe these findings will be useful in identifying common ground for all interested groups and aid us in developing solutions that will have a profound and lasting impact on the lives of unwanted horses and the horse industry at large.”The survey was conducted from November 2008 to January 2009 by an independent market research company. More than 23,000 horse owners, equine industry stakeholders and nonhorse owners participated. For more information, contact Julia Andersen, UHC director, at (202) 296-4031.
http://www.unwantedhorsecoalition.org/


Added opinion or "my ponderings" -
"Regarding placement options for unwanted horses, 63 percent of equine rescue/retirement facilities polled report they are at near or full capacity and, on average, turn away 38 percent of the horses brought to them. Capacity is clearly the issue in that as many horses stay for life at the facilities as are adopted out."

OK that was 63%. Are the other 37% places like "Three Strikes Rescue" needing to be rescued themselves and are now facing prosecution? or are they way over capacity because of the mentality of "whats one more" or "we'll make room if we have to" so the horses do not get all that good care. hmmmm?

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